Is there a role for chronic opioids in IC pain management?

The best approach is a combination of treatments. Some people do well without opioid medicines, but others require more pain management. It is your choice. There may be times that you need pain medication.

This question was answered in the ICA webinar, Q & A: Finding Better Relief, featuring urogynecologist Barry Jarnagin, MD, and urologist Ragi Doggweiler, MD. View the webinar to learn more about this topic.

Regarding conscious pain mapping: If it is bowel related, how can you tell when doing the mapping? Strictly by touching the bowel?

Pain mapping is done by the doctor touching and grasping the intra-abdominal viscera and peritoneum in an attempt to reproduce the patient’s pain. This special laparoscopy can also be done in a conscious patient, who is then usually able to interact with the surgeon to help identify the source of the pain.

Long-term effectiveness and diagnostic accuracy of conscious pain mapping has not yet been established. If mapping bowel pain, the determination is made by strictly touching the bowel.

This question was answered in the ICA webinar, Q & A: Finding Better Relief, featuring urogynecologist Barry Jarnagin, MD, and urologist Ragi Doggweiler, MD. View the webinar to learn more about this topic.

Having suffered chronic pain for over 40 years and after having hundreds of tests and missed diagnoses, how do I live with all the overall body pain?

Finding a solution for 40 years of chronic pain may take a while. Some pain may always persist, and pain meds have the unpleasant side effects of making you tired and weak.

Look into meditation and find routines that you can do on your own. Sometimes little things like listening to certain songs, writing letters to friends to distract from pain, being active in support groups, and helping others. Self hypnosis or meditation or prayer may some relief. Finding a good counselor to help find peace inside you could help.

Many little things that help can make a difference, but it is not going to happen overnight.

This question was answered in the ICA webinar, Q & A: Finding Better Relief, featuring urogynecologist Barry Jarnagin, MD, and urologist Ragi Doggweiler, MD. View the webinar to learn more about this topic.

What do I do if my IC doctor will not treat IC pain?

As government regulations tighten around prescription pain medicines, it can be challenging to find a physician to prescribe pain medicines. There are many medications and techniques to treat pain including over-the-counter medicines, non-narcotic pain medicines, topical medicines, and narcotic pain medicines such as opioids. If opioids are required for your pain and your IC doctor is not comfortable prescribing them, ask for a referral to a pain management specialist who has interest and expertise in this treatment area.

Revised Monday, March 30th, 2015